Little bowl or bucket bag – free tutorial!

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Here’s a bit of a freebie – I have taught this method on Beginner’s Crochet classes as well – they are a great beginners project and the first things I ever made when my friend Boann taught me to crochet round the camp fire a number of years ago. I have written this pattern for complete beginners, so it might seem a bit Janet & John to some! 

This design uses three basic crochet stitches – chain, double and slip stitch which are the basis of many crochet patterns. Once you have mastered the little bowl or bag basics, you can make large versions in many different yarns, and add handles and embellishments if you wish. I have made them in coloured jute string to form a storage basket with a fold over top – you could make pen holders, plant pot covers, children’s play bags, handbags and even large shopping bags using this method – see the Liquorice Allsorts bag I made using this method at the end of this post. 

Essentially you are working ‘in the round’ which some beginners find easier to master than making a straight, flat piece. It demonstrates the versatility of crochet in making flexible, interesting shapes. 

You will need: 

  • a range of yarns in contrasting colours, or a tonal mix, or even just in one colour – you don’t need a lot and this is an ideal way of using up ball ends
  • crochet hooks to suit the weight of the yarn you are using (if in doubt, check the ball band!)
  • a knitters needle for darning in ends
  • a sewing needle for applying any embellishments

The Stitches:

Chain (ch in British patterns) – Bring the yarn over the hook from the back, wrap it round the hook so you have two loops on the hook – the original loop and the new loop. Slide the loops down to the hook end and use the hook to secure the new loop whilst you pull it through the old loop, leaving one loop on the hook. If you keep going you will end up with a series of little chains.  

Slip Stitch (sl st in British patterns) – Insert your hook into the place on the pattern where it tells you to make a slip stitch. Bring the yarn over the hook from the back, then use the hook to pull the new loop on the hook through the stitch you are slip stitching into and at the same time through the original loop on the hook. This is a smooth, single action and is a way of securing work which does not ‘make’ any more textile. 

Double Crochet (dc on British patterns) – insert your hook into the stitch or space as directed by the pattern. Bring the yarn over the hook from the back, wrap it round the hook and use the hook to bring it through the stitch below where you inserted your hook. There will now be two loops on the hook. Then bring the yarn over the hook from the back again and wrap it round so you have three loops on the hook – the original two and the one you have just made. Slide the loops down to the hook end and use the hook to secure the new loop whilst you pull it through the first of the old loops, leaving two loops on the hook. Then bring the yarn over the hook from the back again and wrap it round so you have three loops on the hook – the original two and the one you have just made. Slide the loops down to the hook end and use the hook to secure the new loop whilst you pull it through the both of the remaining loops, leaving the new loop you have just made on the hook! 

 Sounds complicated but it will become second nature as you work it over the over and see the piece growing! 

  1. Plan your colour scheme – first decide which colours and textures you would like in your piece, maybe also what trim and buttons or beads you would like on it too!

    Then get the hooks you need selected and your trims and other equipment ready. 

  1. Crochet your bowl

Round 1 – take the yarn you have chosen for the bowl or bag base then chain 4. Join with a slip stitch to form a ring. Then chain 2 which is your first ‘spoke’ in the wheel you are now going to make. Then double crochet into the ring 11 times. You will end up with a mini wheel with 12 ‘spokes’. 

Round 2 – work two double crochets into each of the stitches from the previous round until you get to the chain two on round 1. Join with a slip stitch. You can change colour if you want to now. To do this, cut off your yarn, leaving a long enough length to darn in afterwards, and pull it through the loop on the hook to secure. The join on your new colour, knotting it in as close as you can to the work. 

Round 3 – pull the new colour in by hooking it through from the back then start any new colours by working a chain 2, work two double crochets into the first stitch on round 3, then work 1 double crochet into the next stitch, continue in this way, alternating two double crochets and 1 double crochets all the way round. If you want to join in a new colour, follow the steps above. 

Round 4 – If you are working a new colour, start off with a chain two, then work two double crochets into the next stitch then one double crochet into the next four stitches, continue alternating in this way until you reach the end of the round. 

If you want to make a larger flat bottom, keep working like this, increasing the number of stitches after the two double crochets into the one stitch. You will get a feel for whether your increasing is correct by having a nice flat piece. If it starts to look wavy, you are putting too many stitches in the round. You can pull it back and work a few less in to get it right!

Round 5 – start to make the sides of the bowl by starting the next round with a chain two then working one double crochet into each stitch on the next round – you will see it start to curl up as go round – this is what you want!

Continue working like this up the straight sides for as tall as you want it to be – taller bowls look good with turned down tops. 

If you want to make a bag you can choose two methods – either join on some straps by working a set of new stitches into the top row of your straight sides then use the same stitch, double crochet, to make two pairs of handles – you just work the stitches back and forth to get long straight pieces – the textile will look slightly different to the bowl shape with more texture to it. Or you can do this:

Decide where to put your handle ‘holes’ along the walls of the bag, then make a chain, as long as you want the handle to be, count the chains then count the same number of stitches from your last row and join the chain back into the top row with a double crochet. Flatten the walls of your bag to work out where the next handle ‘hole’ will be – on the other side of the bag to correspond with the one you have already made. Mark the point you need to get to round the other side of the bag with a pin or marker, then double crochet as before until you get to the pin or marker. Chain the same number you made on the opposite side and join it in in the same way. Then carry on working double crochets along the row, working into the chains, as before until the bag is the height you want it to be. 

Use a knitters needle to darn in all your loose ends and snip off. You can decorate you bag or bowl if you want to, using beads, buttons or even a crochet flower if you know how to make them. 

Happy hooking!

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8 thoughts on “Little bowl or bucket bag – free tutorial!

    • I really recommend taking a class – you learn the right technique, how to use your hands and the hook, all the little wrinkles! If you are in the UK I teach residential courses at the WI’s Denman College – great opportunity to learn a new skill and stay in a beautiful country house!

  1. Pingback: Birthday bowl « Nice piece of work

  2. Pingback: Wibbly wobbly felted crochet | sugarloops

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